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VŠE 2AJ20X (angličtina)

Vítejte na stránce, která by Vám měla pomoci při učení ekonomických definicí v angličtině a tzv. "word building". Definice jsou opsány z nové učebnice pro VŠE kurz 2AJ20X. Jestliže v textech nebo na stránkách najdete jakékoliv chyby - stačí když mi je napíšete na info@stencek.com.

Pozn.: občas se při vypisování definic objeví 1 prázdné pole. Prostě nevyplňujte nic - bude to dobře ;)

Word-building

Glossary: test_22-28

an amount charged for money borrowed
inflation that occurs when total planned spending increases faster than total output, i.e. when too much money is chasing too few goods
a transferable document issued by a bank as evidence that a large sum of money has been lent to the bank for a fixed period of time
assets kept by a bank to be able to provide cash in exchange for deposit balances when needed
(see Labour force) all people of working age, both employed and unemployed
(see Money supply) the total of all the money held by all persons and organizations in a country at a particular time; the whole of a country’s existing stock (or supply) of money to hold as a liquid asset
combination of stagnation and inflation, i.e. existence of high unemployment and recession and high rates of inflation at the same time
the desire to hold money for the purpose of making purchases or expenditures in the near future
money invested in a bank account that pays interest and for which the bank needs a notice in advance if the money is to be taken out
an arrangement where goods and services can be received now and paid for later, within an agreed period
a process by which cheques and other payments are passed through the banking system until the transactions are completed
paper money or coins of little or no intrinsic (material) value in themselves, that is, accepted as money only because the government declares it to be money
a letter from one bank to another bank, by which a third party, usually a customer, is able to obtain money
the easy and speed with which an asset can be converted into a medium of exchange
unemployment resulting from changes in economy itself
information or a warning given in advance about something that is going to happen in the future
a bank that provides finance for companies, esp. by buying stocks and securities and selling them in smaller units to the public
a customer’s instruction to a bank to pay a certain amount to another person or organization at regular intervals
money in the form of coins and notes
the percentage of people in the labour force who cannot find a job but are looking for it
“I owe you” – a piece of paper saying that one owes a certain amount of money to someone, signed and dated, forming a simple acknowledgement of a debt
an investment or item of financial value, esp. a stock, share or debenture, that can be bought and sold on a stock exchange
gradual intensification of inflation
a place where valuable things are stored
a plastic card which is used instead of money to pay for goods and services. The cost is charged to one’s account and paid later
a measure of value and a standard of comparing values of different goods and services
a bank account kept in a foreign currency
unemployment resulting from fluctuations in economic activity
the amount of reserves that banks are required by law to keep, as a fraction of demand deposits
any form of money which by law must be accepted when offered in payment
a method used by central banks to control the level of interest rated by influencing conditions in the money market by buying and selling bonds and securities in the open market, thus reducing or increasing the funds available in the market
a state-owned bank which controls the amount of money available and the general banking systems in a country, and influences interest rates
money provided by a bank to companies and to private persons in the form of loans and overdrafts
single-digit inflation
unemployment caused by new entrants to the job market and people who have left their jobs to look for and find other jobs
a bank account which usually earns little or no interest and from which money can be taken out at any time by cheque
a signed document, such as a Cheque, that orders a person or an organization, such as a bank, to pay a fixed sum of money on demand or on a certain date to the person specifies
an asset which can be used almost as if it were money although it is not
the cost of borrowing money expressed as a percentage of the capital borrowed (úroková míra)
a financial institution that provides insurance
a financial institution that specializes in providing services such as savings accounts as opposed to general banking services
money that has value as a commodity as well as in its role as money, such as precious metals, cows, tobacco, or other tangible goods
1) any kind of money that is in general use as cash, passing from person to person, such as coins and banknotes, 2)the money of a particular country
any article which is widely used because it forms a convenient and commonly acceptable means of payment when goods are exchanged, bought and sold
the ability of the banking system to lend (create money) by a multiple of its excess reserves
(see Credit multiplier or Bank deposits multiplier) the ratio of potential change in the money supply to an initial change in excess reserves
(see Moderate inflation) single-digit inflation
general decrease in prices
inflation of four or more digits
the ability to store wealth or purchasing power for future use
a definition of money including financial assets which are relatively liquid, but not as liquid as narrow money items. A financial asset, which would be regarded as narrow money, would also fall within the definition of broad money, but broad money extends the range of assets, which are regarded as money
gold or silver in the form of bars not coins
alternative measures of the money supply which differ from each other according to which types of deposits are included
money collected from employers and employees, or by the State, and invested to provide future pensions
one of a series of payments, usually as a means of buying goods
(also called: high-powered money) cash in circulation with the public plus bank’s till money and bank’s operational deposits at the central bank
double or triple digit inflation
a financial intermediary with a government license to make loans and issue deposits
inflation that occurs when restrictions are placed on the supply of factor inputs, or, when the prices of those inputs are increased
(ses Cheque) a special printed form filled in a signed by a person (the drawer) asking a bank (the drawee) to pay a sum of money to someone (the payee)
(see Hyperinflation) inflation of four or more digits
reserves held by banks in excess of the amounts required by law that are available to lend
a special printed form filled in a signed by a person (the drawer) asking a bank (the drawee) to pay a sum of money to someone (the payee)
all people of working age, both employed and unemployed
a general continuous increase in the average level of prices of goods and services in the economy
a small plastic card with a memory chip
a loan made by a bank to a customer so s/he may withdraw more money than is actually in the bank account
a payment to someone for providing a service or a good, usually a percentage of the total value of the deal
the system of exchanging goods for other goods rather than for money
a book that lists all payments into and withdrawals from a savings bank account
a type of a current account used mainly by employees
financial assets which perform the functions of money when a fairly narrow definition of liquidity is applied
the fact that payments to be made in the future are usually specified in terms of money
(see Bank deposits multiplier or Money multiplier) the ratio of potential change in the money supply to an initial change in excess reserves
the relation between a bank’s total cash reserves of notes, coin, etc. and its total deposit liabilities
the act of sending or transferring money; the amount sent
middlemen who bring borrowers and lenders together
the desire to hold money as one of many kinds of financial assets, negatively related to the interest rate
the total of all the money held by all persons and organizations in a country at a particular time; the whole of a country’s existing stock (or supply) of money to hold as a liquid asset
a plastic card which is used instead of money or a cheque to pay for goods and services. The cost is taken directly from the user’s bank account. Debit cards can also be used to obtain money from cash dispensers
(see Current Account) a bank account which usually earns little or no interest and from which money can be taken out at any time by cheque
(see Credit multiplier or Money multiplier) the ratio of potential change in the money supply to an initial change in excess reserves
the rate of interest charged by a central bank to commercial banks that borrows from it
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